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Currently I have Decided to Empower Businessmen/Businesswomen With Adequate Grant/Loan to Help Develop the Global Economies.
9/13/2017

Adequate Grants/Loan for Businessmen/Businesswoman Basically for Koreans and other regional citizens of China and Globally.
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End Poverty

Our Mission The World Bank Group has two goals, To end extreme poverty and promote shared prosperity in a sustainable way WHO

Our Mission The World Bank Group has two goals, To end extreme poverty and promote shared prosperity in a sustainable way  to End Poverty.

End Poverty
The World Bank is like a cooperative, made up of 189 member countries. These member countries, or shareholders, are represented by a Board of Governors, who are the ultimate policymakers at the World Bank. Generally, the governors are member countries’ ministers of finance or ministers of development. They meet once a year at the Annual Meetings of the Boards of Governors of the World Bank Group and the International Monetary Fund.

The governors delegate specific duties to 25 Executive Directors, who work on-site at the Bank. The five largest shareholders appoint an executive director, while other member countries are represented by elected executive directors.

World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim chairs meetings of the Boards of Directors and is responsible for overall management of the Bank. The President is selected by the Board of Executive Directors for a five-year, renewable term.
The Executive Directors make up the Boards of Directors of the World Bank. They normally meet at least twice a week to oversee the Bank’s business, including approval of loans and guarantees, new policies, the administrative budget, country assistance strategies and borrowing and financial decisions.
The World Bank operates day-to-day under the leadership and direction of the president, management and senior staff, and the vice presidents in charge of Global Practices, Cross-Cutting Solutions Areas, regions, and functions.

Five Institutions, One Group
The World Bank Group consists of five organizations:

The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development
The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) lends to governments of middle-income and creditworthy low-income countries.
The International Development Association
The International Development Association (IDA) provides interest-free loans — called credits — and grants to governments of the poorest countries.
Together, IBRD and IDA make up the World Bank.
The International Finance Corporation
The International Finance Corporation (IFC) is the largest global development institution focused exclusively on the private sector. We help developing countries achieve sustainable growth by financing investment, mobilizing capital in international financial markets, and providing advisory services to businesses and governments.
The Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency
The Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) was created in 1988 to promote foreign direct investment into developing countries to support economic growth, reduce poverty, and improve people’s lives. MIGA fulfills this mandate by offering political risk insurance (guarantees) to investors and lenders.
The International Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes
The International Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) provides international facilities for conciliation and arbitration of investment disputes.
Poverty At-A-Glance
WorldBank.Org
The World Bank is like a cooperative, made up of 189 member countries. These member countries, or shareholders, are represented by a Board of Governors, who are the ultimate policymakers at the World Bank. Generally, the governors are member countries’ ministers of finance or ministers of development.
End Poverty
The World Bank Group is committed to fighting poverty in all of its dimensions. We use the latest evidence and analysis to help governments develop sound policies that can help the poorest in every country improve their lives.
Student Empowerment
Adequate Grants for Businessmen/Businesswoman Basically for Koreans and other regional citizens of China and Globally.
More inclusive trade can be achieved through policies focused on active labor markets, better education and life-long learning.
End Poverty
End Poverty
Grow, invest, insure : a game plan to end extreme poverty by 2030

As global extreme poverty has fallen — by one measure, from close to 2 billion people in 1990 to about 700 million today — the world has learned about antipoverty strategies that work. These experiences should inform the final push to end extreme poverty. In the 1960s and 1970s, when close to half of the world was living in extreme poverty, the approach that worked best consisted of two sets of complementary measures: encouraging broad-based growth that is labor using, and investing in education, health, and family planning. When extreme poverty rates came down—first in East Asia and then in other parts of the developing world—it became clear that the two-point strategy to make economies grow and enable people to invest in human capital needed a social assistance supplement to help people with disadvantages so severe that they could not benefit from economic opportunities and better social services. This two-and-a-half-point strategy has been working well over the past quarter century, and the end of extreme poverty is in sight. But more people are now at risk of slipping back into poverty because of economic, natural, and health-related hazards. To end extreme poverty by 2030, the approach now needs three complementary components: economic growth, investments in people, and measures to insure against setbacks to families, nations, and regions due to disabilities, recessions, disasters, and disease. In countries that have reduced poverty a lot and those that could do a lot better, a winning game plan for putting a quick end to extreme poverty should be based on a three-point strategy: grow, invest, and insure.

                                                                                                                                     

Monitoring global poverty : report of the commission on global poverty (English)
ABSTRACT

In 2013, the World Bank Group announced two goals that would guide its operations worldwide. The first is the eradication of chronic extreme poverty — bringing the number of extremely poor people, defined as those living on less than 1.25 ppp-adjusted dollars a day, to less than 3 percent of the world population by 2030. The second is the boosting of shared prosperity, defined as promoting the growth of per capita real income of the poorest 40 percent of the population in each country. Last year, UN member nations agreed in New York to a set of post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), the first and foremost of which is the eradication of extreme poverty everywhere, in all its forms. Both the language and the spirit of the SDG objective reflect the growing acceptance of the idea that poverty is a multi-dimensional concept that reflects multiple deprivations in various aspects of well-being. That said, there is much less agreement on the best ways in which those deprivations should be measured; and on whether or how information on them should be aggregated. This report advises the Bank on the measurement and monitoring of global poverty on two areas: what should be the interpretation of the definition of extreme poverty, set in 2015 in Purchasing Power Parity (PPP)-adjusted dollars a day per person and what choices should the World Bank make regarding complementary monetary and non-monetary poverty measures to be tracked and made available to policy-makers? The World Bank plays an important role in shaping the global debate on combating poverty, and the indicators and data the Bank collates and makes available shape opinion and actual policies in client countries, and, to a certain extent, in all countries. How we answer the above questions can therefore have a major influence on the global economy.

Global Empowerment

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Women Empowerment
Women Empowerment
Adequate Grants for Businesswoman Basically for Africans Women, Asian Women and other regional citizens of China and Globally.
More inclusive trade can be achieved through policies focused on active labor markets, better education and life-long learning.
Students Empowerment
Scholarships for Students above secondary school level. Basically for African, American and other regional citizens of China and Globally.
More effective Education can be achieved through policies focused on active in academical aspect , Institutions and better education and life-long learning.
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